Richard Frethorne Describes Indentured Servitude In Early America [ 1623 AD ]

Life in early colonial Virginia was difficult, brutish, and short-lived as it got for a seventeenth-century Englishmen, as shown in the sufferings of Richard Frethorne. In today’s post, readers get to look at Frethrone’s letters home. It is a great account as to what life was like for an Indentured servant in the new world and their experiences.

“few documents remain from common people for the whole of the seventeenth-century, especially so for those in the early settler colonies, making documents like Richard Frethorne’s letters to his parents both rare and precious. Frethorne was an indentured servant in Virginia, whose parents contracted him into servitude in the early 1620s.”

Anthony Comegna , Assistant Editor for Intellectual History



SOURCE:

In early 1623, the indentured servant Richard Frethorne came to the colony of Jamestown. He wrote to his parents soon after about the suffering he observed. From Voices of A People’s History, edited by Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove.

LETTER:

Loving and Kind Mother and Father:

My most humble duty remembered to you, hoping in god of your good health, as I myself am at the making hereof. This is to let you understand that I your child am in a most heavy case by reason of the country, is such that it causeth much sickness, as the scurvy and the bloody flux and diverse other diseases, which maketh the body very poor and weak. And when we are sick there is nothing to comfort us; for since I came out of the ship I never ate anything but peas, and loblollie (that is, water gruel). As for deer or venison I never saw any since I came into this land. There is indeed some fowl, but we are not allowed to go and get it, but must work hard bath early and late for a mess of water gruel and a mouthful of bread and beef.

A mouthful of bread for a penny loaf must serve for four men which is most pitiful. If you did know as much as I, when people cry out day and night—Oh! That they were in England without their limbs— and would not care to lose any limb to be in England again, yea, though they beg from door to door. For we live in fear of the enemy every hour, yet we have had a combat with them … and we took two alive and made slaves of them. But it was by policy, for we are in great danger; for our plantation is very weak by reason of the death and sickness of our company. For we came but twenty for the merchants, and they are half dead just; and we look every hour when two more should go.

Yet there came some four other men yet to live with us, of which there is but one alive; and our Lieutenant is dead, and [also] his father and his brother. And there was some five or six of the last year’s twenty, of which there is but three left, so that we are fain to get other men to plant with us; and yet we are but 32 to fight against 3000 if they should come. And the nighest help that we have is ten mile of us, and when the rogues overcame this place last they slew 80 persons.

How then shall we do, for we lie even in their teeth? They may easily take us, but that God is merciful and can save with few as well as with many, as he showed to Gilead. And like Gilead’s soldiers, if they lapped water, we drink water which is but weak. And I have nothing to comfort me, nor is there nothing to be gotten here but sickness and death, except [in the event] that one had money to lay out in some things for profit. But I have nothing at all—no, not a shirt to my back but two rags, nor clothes but one poor suit, nor but one pair of shoes, but one pair of stockings, but one cap, but two bands. My cloak is stolen by one of my fellows, and to his dying hour would not tell me what he did with it; but some of my fellows saw him have butter and beef out of a ship, which my cloak, I doubt, paid for. So that I have not a penny, nor a penny worth, to help me coo either spice or sugar or strong waters, without the which one cannot live here.

For as strong beer in England doth ratten and strengthen them, so water here doth wash and weaken these here [and] only keeps [their] life and soul together. But I am not half a quarter so strong as I was in England, and all is for want of victuals; for I do protest unto you that I have eaten mote in day at home than I have allowed me here for a week. You have given more than my days allowance to a beggar at the door; and if Mr. Jackson had not relieved me, I should be in a poor case. But he like a father and she like a loving mother doth still help me.

For when we go to Jamestown (that is 10 miles of us) there lie all the ships that come to land, and there they must deliver their goods. And when we went up to town, as it may be, on Monday at noon, and come there by night, then load the next day by noon, and go home in the afternoon, and unload, and then away again in the night, and [we must] be up about midnight. Then if it rained or blowed never so hard, we must lie in the boat on the water and have nothing but a little bread.

For when we go into the boat we [would] have a loaf allowed to two men, and it is all [we would get] if we stayed there two days, which is hard; and [we] must lie all that while in the boat. But that Goodman Jackson pitied me and made me a cabin to lie in always when I [would] come up, and he would give me some poor jacks [fish] [to take] home with me, which comforted me more than peas or water gruel.

Oh, they be very godly folks, and love me very well, and will do anything for me. And he much marvelled that you would send me a servant to the Company; he saith I had been better knocked on the head. And indeed so I find it now, to my great grief and misery; and [I] saith that if you love me you will redeem me suddenly, for which I do entreat and beg. And if you cannot get the merchants to redeem me for some little money, then for God’s sake get a gathering or entreat some good folks to lay out some little sum of money in meal and cheese and butter and beef. Any eating meat will yield great profit. Oil and vinegar is very good; but, father, there is great loss in leaking. But for God’s sake send beef and cheese and butter, or the more of one sort and none of another.

But if you send cheese, it must be very old cheese; and at the cheesemonger’s you may buy very food cheese for twopence farthing or halfpenny, that will be liked very well. But if you send cheese, you must have a care how you pack it in barrels; and you must put cooper’s chips between every cheese, or else the heat of the hold will rot them. And look whatsoever you send me — be in never so much—look, what[ever] I make of it, I will deal truly with you. I will send it over and beg the profit to redeem me; and if I die before it come, I have entreated Goodman Jackson to send you the worth of it, who hath promised he will. If you send, you must direct your letters to Goodman Jackson, at Jamestown, a gunsmith.

Good father, do not forget me, but have mercy and pity my miserable case. I know if you did but see me, you would weep to see me; for I have but one suit. (But [though] it is a strange one, it is very well guarded.) Wherefore, for God’s sake, pity me. I pray you to remember my love to all my friends and kindred. I hope all my brothers and sisters are in good health, and as for my pan I have set down my resolution that certainly will be; that is, that the answer of this letter will be life or death to me. Therefore, good father, send as soon as you can; and if you send me any thing let this be the mark.



BOOK PICK OF THE DAY 

The story of how the 13 North American colonies established by Great Britain went on to form the nucleus of the United States is both fascinating and complex. Since its initial publication in 1992, Colonial America has garnered wide acclaim for its accessibility and well-balanced approach in revealing the myriad in??? uences that shaped early American history to a wide audience. The fourth edition is certain to enhance its sterling reputation as the standard textbook for students of this seminal period of American history.

Fully updated and revised to re??? the most recent scholarship, the fourth edition features extensive new coverage of the simultaneous development of French, Spanish, and Dutch colonies in North America. Other additions include enhanced coverage of the English colony of Barbados and trans-Atlantic in??? uences on colonial development, as well as rewritten and updated chapters on families and women. More focused attention is also given to the perspectives of Native Americans and their important in??? uences in shaping the history and development of the colonies.

With its continued in-depth coverage of the background, founding, and development of the 13 English North American colonies, Colonial America: A History to 1763, Fourth Edition offers the most complete portrait of the diverse people, events, and in??? uences that lead to the creation of the United States.

CLICK HERE TO GET A COPY OF THE BOOK! 


FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

FACEBOOK PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/TheChroniclesOfHistory
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/SamanthaJJamesx
INTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/sammyloveshistory
PINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.com/thechroniclesofhistoryblog
TUMBLR: https://samanthajameswriter.tumblr.com/
REDDIT: https://www.reddit.com/user/SammyLovesHistory

JOIN THE HISTORY TABLE! 

The History Table is a set of groups I created on social media as a way for Historians and history lovers to share their work. A good place to discuss, learn, and find interesting history. The History Table’s goal is to be open to all sorts history and diving into the past of those who came before us. I simply ask that we all remain civil towards one another even in times of disagreement. No politics, with the minor exception that politics are acceptable in the context and history they took place in. That is really my only guidelines on protecting the atmosphere of the group and keeping it all about the history we all love so much to read and talk about. Thank you very much!

JOIN THE HISTORY TABLE HERE: 


SUGGESTED BOOKS: 


REFERENCES: 


5 thoughts on “Richard Frethorne Describes Indentured Servitude In Early America [ 1623 AD ]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s